How to Paint a Restoration Hardware type Finish on a Table

Finished Table

I found this little table and 4 chairs at a garage sale.

The original finish was maple.  It needed some work and I decided to update it with paint. (of course!)

I really DO NOT like to strip furniture!

But I felt like I needed to strip the top of this table so that the paint would penetrate the wood and give a more interesting finish.

 After stripping the top, I made a mix of half and half French Linen and Old White Chalk Paint®.

This mix creates a light grey color.

I added about 20% water to thin it.

I painted the top with the French Linen/Old White mixture –

as you can see, I really didn’t try to cover it evenly.

Let it dry.  (Doesn’t take too long to dry!  Maybe 30 minutes or so.)

After it dried, I sanded the top using an electric sander.

I don’t usually use an electric sander when distressing Chalk Paint® or Milk Paint, but in this case, I wanted to do alot more sanding than ususal and the electric sander is much quicker.  I used 220 grit sandpaper.

The sanding makes the surface very smooth and shows up the grain in the wood.

The next step was to apply a second color.

I used Miss Mustard Seed Milk Paint “Trophy”, which is a dark grey.

The great thing about Milk Paint is that it soaks into the surface more than other paint and really creates depth.

I mixed the Trophy powder about 1:3 with water to make a wash.

I covered the whole surface with the thinned out Milk Paint.

This layer will dry quickly also!

Sand with electric sander.

 

My goal with the sanding was to smooth the surface again and to show up some of the warmth of the wood grain.

At this point, the overall color was a bit too gray, so I wanted to add some lightness.

I thinned down some Old White Chalk Paint®.

Painted a thin layer over the surface, not a perfect coat, just enough to cover.

Let it dry and sand again.

I have to admit that I didn’t really know what I was doing during this whole process! 

I knew I wanted sort of a white wash look but with some grey tones.

The finish evolved as I applied each layer.  At one point, I thought I was going to hate this finish but it started getting more beautiful as I added each color.   Someone had once told me  (I think it was Annie Sloan!) that, when adding layers of paint, start with a medium tone as the first color and then add the dark and light over top.  I used this advice for this table top and it worked great!

The final step was to apply Clear Soft Wax, two coats.

I experimented with adding a layer of Dark Wax on top of the Clear Wax but I didn’t like it, so I wiped it off with a little bit of mineral spirits.

 

The base of the table and the chairs were painted with Old White Chalk Paint® and Clear Soft Wax.

Before and After

It really is a very pretty finish and is not hard to do.

Don’t be afraid to use layers and to experiment with using Chalk Paint® and MMS Milk Paint together on the same piece!

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6 comments

  • Anne brolley August 31, 2015  

    Just gorgeous
    Can we do a class on this technique?

    • BrushStrokes September 3, 2015  

      Anne, That might be something to think about! Table tops are always a challenge, I think.

  • Carrie halstead August 31, 2015  

    That is really beautiful work! I am going to use this process on my oak dining table. Thank you for sharing this

    • BrushStrokes September 3, 2015  

      Carrie, Thank you so much! It will be beautiful on your dining room table!

  • Janette Walsh September 1, 2015  

    Always helpful with my multiple project with consistent great results.

    • BrushStrokes September 3, 2015  

      Janette, We love helping our customers with their projects!